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The Knock Effect of Plantar Fasciitis Pain.

Plantar Fasciitis is a condition that affects the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot from the heel to the toe, but often it can have an impact on other areas of the body. In this article, we are going to answer some of the common questions about the knock-on effect that Plantar Fasciitis can have on the rest of the body.

But before we dive into the impact that Plantar Fasciitis can have on the rest of the body we first have to understand how everything is linked together in something called the Posterior chain.

What is the Posterior Muscle Chain?

The Knock On Effect Of Achilles Tendonitis On The Body What Are The Posterior Chain Muscles


Posterior chain
 muscles are the main engine for running. Examples
of the muscles that make up your posterior chain muscles are;

- plantar muscles (sole of the foot)

- calf muscles (connected through the Achilles tendon)

- the hamstrings,

- the gluteus maximus,

- erector spinae muscle group (lower back)

- trapezius (mid-upper back)

- posterior deltoids (shoulders).

Referred pain and secondary injuries occur when the body alters or avoids certain movements due to pain and to reduce the risk of further injury. As an example, with Plantar Fasciitis, you may walk with a limp. this puts additional stress on the joints like the hip and knee as well as a transfer of weight onto the non-injured side.

Riixo Plantar Fasciitis Pain

Head over to the Physio Room for a detailed review of Plantar Fasciitis, what causes the condition, how to test for it, treat it and how to prevent it from coming back again. Just click on the link below to read more.

Can Plantar Fasciitis Cause Ankle Pain?

Yes. You can experience ankle pain when you have Plantar Fasciitis due to an altered gait pattern when you walk or run.

Gait is the way a person moves when they walk or run. An altered gait pattern is a change in these movements, in this case, as a result of pain in the foot from plantar fasciitis. When a gait pattern is altered, it can cause pain in the ankle joint due to the increased tension on the muscles and tendons around the ankle, or due to increased stress on the joint itself. An altered gait pattern can also cause increased wear and tear on the structures of the ankle joint, leading to inflammation, pain, and decreased range of motion.

Can Plantar Fascitis Cause Back Pain

Can Plantar Fasciitis Cause Back Pain?

If you have plantar fasciitis, you may have noticed that it can cause knee pain.

The plantar fascia is a band of connective tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot and connects to your toes. When the plantar fascia becomes inflamed or injured, it can cause pain in the bottom of your foot—and this can sometimes lead to knee pain.

So why does plantar fasciitis cause knee pain? The answer lies in the biomechanics of running and walking. When you walk or run, your heel strikes the ground first and then rolls forward as your leg pushes into extension. As your body moves forward, each foot has to absorb shock from landing on the ground, as well as push off against it as you move forward again. This puts stress on both the hips and knees; if there's inflammation or injury in either area (like with plantar fasciitis), it can make things worse when walking or running because there's already an imbalance between them.

Can Plantar Fasciitis Cause Calf Pain?

Yes, Plantar Fasciitis can cause calf pain. This is often a result of the altered mechanics of your gait but can also be from the overuse injury to the foot as the calf muscles are connected to the plantar fascia through the Achilles tendon.

The plantar fascia is a thick band of connective tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, from the heel to the ball of the foot. Plantar Fasciitis can be a very painful condition and can cause pain in the heel, arch, and calf. The calf muscles are connected to the plantar fascia, so when the plantar fascia is strained, it can cause the calf muscles to become tense, resulting in calf pain.

Another way that Plantar Fasciitis can cause calf pain is through a change in your gait pattern when walking and running. The body will naturally avoid painful movements and why you may walk with a slight limp or avoid putting too much pressure on the painful foot. Changing this weight distribution it will increase the stress through the calf muscles causing. This increased load and overuse can cause muscle tightness and calf pain.

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Can Plantar Fasciitis Cause Knee Pain?

Yes, it can, due to altered mechanics whilst walking or running.

Our bodies are designed to distribute weight through the limbs in a specific way to minimise the stress on the joints. When you have an injury, such as Plantar Fasciitis, the body will naturally try to avoid performing painful movements and it will alter your weight distribution. This is why you may walk with a limp or avoid putting your full weight through your foot. Changing the weight distribution of your gait pattern will increase the stress through the knees, often the knee on the opposite side to your painful foot. Repetitive loading of this leg is what can lead to knee pain from plantar fasciitis.

Riixo Plantar Fasciitis Pain

Head over to the Physio Room for a detailed review of Plantar Fasciitis, what causes the condition, how to test for it, treat it and how to prevent it from coming back again. Just click on the link below to read more.

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